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Investigation of the microbial metabolism of carbon dioxide and hydrogen in the kangaroo foregut by stable isotope probing

Godwin, S. and Kang, A. and Gulino, L. M. and Manefield, M. and Gutierrez-Zamora, M. L. and Kienzle, M. and Ouwerkerk, D. and Dawson, K. and Klieve, A. V. (2014) Investigation of the microbial metabolism of carbon dioxide and hydrogen in the kangaroo foregut by stable isotope probing. ISME Journal . ISSN 17517362 (ISSN)

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2014.25

Abstract

Kangaroos ferment forage material in an enlarged forestomach analogous to the rumen, but in contrast to ruminants, they produce little or no methane. The objective of this study was to identify the dominant organisms and pathways involved in hydrogenotrophy in the kangaroo forestomach, with the broader aim of understanding how these processes are able to predominate over methanogenesis. Stable isotope analysis of fermentation end products and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) were used to investigate the organisms and biochemical pathways involved in the metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach. Our results clearly demonstrate that the activity of bacterial reductive acetogens is a key factor in the reduced methane output of kangaroos. In in vitro fermentations, the microbial community of the kangaroo foregut produced very little methane, but produced a significantly greater proportion of acetate derived from carbon dioxide than the microbial community of the bovine rumen. A bacterial operational taxonomic unit closely related to the known reductive acetogen Blautia coccoides was found to be associated with carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism in the kangaroo foregut. Other bacterial taxa including members of the genera Prevotella, Oscillibacter and Streptococcus that have not previously been reported as containing hydrogenotrophic organisms were also significantly associated with metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 13 March 2014; doi:10.1038/ismej.2014.25.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Animal Science
Subjects:Science > Biology > Biochemistry
Animal culture
Veterinary medicine > Veterinary bacteriology
Deposited On:01 Jul 2014 04:22
Last Modified:01 Jul 2014 04:22

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