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Growth of the invasive Navua sedge (Cyperus aromaticus) under competitive interaction with pasture species and simulated grazing conditions: Implication for management

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Shi, B., Osunkoya, O. O., Soni, A., Campbell, S. D. and Dhileepan, K. Growth of the invasive Navua sedge (Cyperus aromaticus) under competitive interaction with pasture species and simulated grazing conditions: Implication for management. Ecological Research, n/a (n/a). ISSN 0912-3814

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Article Link(s): https://doi.org/10.1111/1440-1703.12369

Publisher URL: https://esj-journals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1440-1703.12369

Abstract

Abstract Navua sedge (Cyperus aromaticus), a perennial monocot plant native to tropical Africa, is a major weed in pasture and cropping areas in the wet tropical regions of Australia and South Pacific countries. In grazing pasture lands, rapid growth and reproduction of unpalatable Navua sedge leads to displacement of co-occurring pasture species and depletion of livestock carrying capacity and production. Understanding the interspecific competitive ability of Navua sedge with co-occurring desirable grasses and in response to varying ecological scenarios (e.g., grazing and plant density) is critical for the management of the weed in pasture situations. In a glasshouse setting, two co-occurring pasture species—humidicola (Urochloa humidicola) and Rhodes grass (Chloris gayana) were grown with Navua sedge, in pots using a replacement series model. For each Navua sedge weed–pasture species pair, the experimental setup comprised of four ratios in two densities under simulated grazing and nongrazing conditions of the pasture grasses. Navua sedge growth and reproduction was highest when it grew as a monoculture or when co-occurring pastures were exposed to simulated grazing as this action, reduced the competitiveness of the pasture grasses. Overall and using biomass gained, tiller production and relative yield as indices of growth dynamics, Rhodes grass was more competitive against Navua sedge than humidicola in both grazed and nongrazed conditions especially under high plant density. These results suggest the potential to include competitive pastures in integrated management strategies for Navua sedge, but species selection and grazing practices may influence the effectiveness of this approach.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Biosecurity Queensland
Subjects:Science > Statistics > Simulation modelling
Plant pests and diseases
Plant pests and diseases > Weeds, parasitic plants etc
Animal culture > Rangelands. Range management. Grazing
Deposited On:02 Dec 2022 00:38
Last Modified:02 Dec 2022 00:38

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