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Germination, persistence, and emergence of flaxleaf fleabane (Conyza bonariensis[L.] Cronquist)

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Wu, H., Walker, S., Rollin, M. J., Tan, D. K.Y., Robinson, G. and Werth, J. (2007) Germination, persistence, and emergence of flaxleaf fleabane (Conyza bonariensis[L.] Cronquist). Weed Biology and Management, 7 (3). pp. 192-199. ISSN 1445-6664

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Article Link: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1445-6664.2007.00256.x

Abstract

Flaxleaf fleabane (Conyza bonariensis[L.] Cronquist) is a difficult-to-control weed in dryland minimum tillage farming systems in the northern grains region of Australia. Experiments under field and controlled environments were conducted to study the seed germination, emergence, and persistence of C. bonariensis. The base, optimum, and maximum temperatures for seedling germination were estimated at 4.2, 20, and 35°C, respectively, with light stimulating germination. The soil types and burial depths had significant effects on seed persistence and emergence. The persistence pattern showed an initial rapid drop, followed by a slow but steady decline over time. After 3 years of burial, there were ≈ 7.5%, 9.7%, and 1.3% viable seeds at 10, 5, and 0–2 cm soil depths, respectively. Conyza bonariensis predominantly emerged from the soil surface or from the burial depth of 0.5 cm. Very few seeds emerged from a depth of 1 cm and none emerged from ≥ 2 cm. The emergence was greater in lighter soils. On-farm monitoring of the field emergence over time in a light sandy loam soil showed that 99% emergence occurred in late autumn, early and late winter, and a small fraction of 1% emerged in mid-spring. The predominant emergence from the soil surface suggests that the fleabane problem is a result of weed species shift toward the minimum tillage systems that provide moist conditions for better emergence compared to conventional tillage systems. The seed longevity of at least 3 years in the soil and the prolonged emergence patterns between autumn and spring have posed great difficulties for the long-term management of C. bonariensis.

Item Type:Article
Subjects:Plant pests and diseases > Weeds, parasitic plants etc
Plant pests and diseases > Pest control and treatment of diseases. Plant protection
Live Archive:19 Feb 2024 02:09
Last Modified:19 Feb 2024 02:09

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