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Rapid sample preparation and low-resource molecular detection of hepatopancreatic parvoviruses (HPV) by recombinase polymerase amplification lateral flow detection assay in shrimps (Fenneropenaeus merguiensis)

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Pollak, N. M., Fais, O., Kristoffersen, J., Phuthaworn, C., Knibb, W. and Macdonald, J. (2022) Rapid sample preparation and low-resource molecular detection of hepatopancreatic parvoviruses (HPV) by recombinase polymerase amplification lateral flow detection assay in shrimps (Fenneropenaeus merguiensis). PLOS ONE, 17 (11). e0276164.

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Article Link(s): https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0276164

Abstract

Background Viral diseases are a major problem in shrimp aquaculture facilities as these diseases reduce growth rates, which inevitably lead to production and profit losses. Hepatopancreatic parvoviruses (HPV) are common diseases in shrimp that appear to be associated with high or low levels of replication in specific genetic lineages. Selective breeding may result in resistance to HPV and improved body traits such as body weight, meat yield and shrimp colour, facilitating shrimp farming. HPV virus titre is commonly determined by quantitative PCR (qPCR), which is a time-consuming method requiring laboratory equipment unsuitable for field implementation. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, robust, rapid and reliable method to detect HPV in low-resource environments. Methods We developed a rapid shrimp HPV test that uses (1) a simple three-step sample preparation protocol, followed by (2) isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) and lateral flow strip detection (LFD). Analytical sensitivity testing was performed in a background banana shrimp sample matrix, and retrospective testing of Fenneropenaeus merguiensis hepatopancreas tissues (n = 33) with known qPCR viral titres was used to determine diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results The rapid shrimp HPV test could detect as little as 35 genome-equivalent copies per reaction in homogenized F. merguiensis banana shrimp. Retrospective testing of stored tissues (n = 33) indicated 100% diagnostic sensitivity (95% confidence interval, CI: 86–100%) and 100% specificity (95% CI: 66–100%) for detection of HPV. Conclusion The rapid shrimp HPV test could be completed in only 40 minutes, and required only homogenization pestles, some pipettors, and a small heating block for single temperature incubation at 39°C. Critically, our procedure eliminated the time-consuming purification of nucleic acids from samples and when combined with RPA-LFD offers a user-friendly HPV detection format that can potentially be performed on-site. Our approach represents a major step forward in the development of a simple and sensitive end-point method for quick determination of unfavourable HPV virus numbers in shrimp, and has great potential to advance on-site management of shrimps in aquaculture.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Horticulture and Forestry Science
Subjects:Veterinary medicine > Veterinary virology
Aquaculture and Fisheries > Fisheries > Fishery research
Deposited On:24 Nov 2022 04:48
Last Modified:24 Nov 2022 04:48

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