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Helicoverpa armigera preference and performance on three cultivars of short-duration pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan): the importance of whole plant assays

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Volp, T. M., Zalucki, M. P. and Furlong, M. J. Helicoverpa armigera preference and performance on three cultivars of short-duration pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan): the importance of whole plant assays. Pest Management Science, n/a (n/a). ISSN 1526-498X

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Article Link(s): https://doi.org/10.1002/ps.7230

Publisher URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ps.7230

Abstract

BACKGROUND Helicoverpa armigera is a major pest of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan). Efforts to develop pigeonpea varieties resistant to H. armigera attack have been met with limited success, despite reports of high levels of resistance to H. armigera in wild relatives of pigeonpea and reports of low to moderate levels of resistance in cultivated varieties. Here we examined H. armigera oviposition preference and larval performance on whole plants of three cultivars of short-duration pigeonpea: a susceptible control (ICPL 87) and two cultivars with purported host–plant resistance (ICPL 86012 and ICPL 88039). RESULTS In our no-choice oviposition experiment, H. armigera laid similar numbers of eggs on all three cultivars tested, but under choice conditions moths laid slightly more eggs on ICPL 88039. Larval growth and development were affected by cultivar, and larvae grew to the largest size (weight) and developed fastest on ICPL 86012. Moths laid most of their eggs on floral structures, sites where subsequent early instar larvae overwhelmingly fed. Experimentally placing neonate larvae at different locations on plants demonstrated that larvae placed on flowers experienced greater survival, faster development, and greater weight gain than those placed on leaves. The type and density of trichomes (a potential resistance trait) differed among cultivars and plant structures, but larvae selected to feed at sites where trichomes were absent. CONCLUSION Future work examining host–plant resistance against H. armigera should incorporate the behavioural preference of moths and larvae in experiments using whole plants as opposed to bioassays of excised plant parts in Petri dishes. © 2022 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Crop and Food Science
Subjects:Science > Botany > Genetics
Plant culture > Field crops
Plant pests and diseases
Deposited On:24 Nov 2022 03:44
Last Modified:24 Nov 2022 03:44

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