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Resporulation of Calcium Alginate Encapsulated Metarhizium anisopliae on Metham - Fumigated Soil and Infectivity on Larvae of Tenebrio molitor

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Shah, S., Ash, G. J. and Wilson, B. A. L. (2022) Resporulation of Calcium Alginate Encapsulated Metarhizium anisopliae on Metham - Fumigated Soil and Infectivity on Larvae of Tenebrio molitor. Journal of Fungi, 8 (10). p. 1114. ISSN 2309-608X

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Article Link(s): https://doi.org/10.3390/jof8101114

Publisher URL: https://www.mdpi.com/2309-608X/8/10/1114

Abstract

Metarhizium anisopliae infects and kills a large range of insects and is a promising biocontrol agent to manage soil insects, such as wireworm in sweetpotato. The presence of other soil microbes, which exhibit competitive fungistasis, may inhibit the establishment of M. anisopliae in soil. Microbially depleted soil, for example, sterilized soil, has been shown to improve the resporulation of the fungus from nutrient-fortified M. anisopliae. Prior to planting, sweetpotato plant beds can be disinfected with fumigants, such as Metham®, to control soil-borne pests and weeds. Metham® is a broad-spectrum soil microbial suppressant; however, its effect on Metarhizium spp. is unclear. In the research presented here, fungal resporulation was examined in Metham®-fumigated soil and the infectivity of the resulting granule sporulation was evaluated on mealworm, as a proxy for wireworm. The fungal granules grown on different soil treatments (fumigated, field and pasteurized soil) resporulated profusely (for example, 4.14 × 107 (±2.17 × 106) conidia per granule on fumigated soil), but the resporulation was not significantly different among the three soil treatments. However, the conidial germination of the resporulated granules on fumigated soil was >80%, which was significantly higher than those on pasteurized soil or field soil. The resporulated fungal granules were highly infective, causing 100% insect mortality 9 days after the inoculation, regardless of soil treatments. The results from this research show that the fungal granules applied to soils could be an infective inoculant in sweetpotato fields in conjunction with soil fumigation. Additional field studies are required to validate these results and to demonstrate integration with current farming practices

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Crop and Food Science
Subjects:Science > Entomology
Agriculture > Agriculture (General) > Soils. Soil science
Plant culture
Plant culture > Vegetables
Deposited On:15 Nov 2022 03:59
Last Modified:15 Nov 2022 03:59

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