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Antimicrobial susceptibility, plasmid replicon typing, phylogenetic grouping, and virulence potential of avian pathogenic and faecal Escherichia coli isolated from meat chickens in Australia

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Awawdeh, L., Turni, C., Mollinger, J. L., Henning, J., Cobbold, R. N., Trott, D. J. and Gibson, J. S. (2022) Antimicrobial susceptibility, plasmid replicon typing, phylogenetic grouping, and virulence potential of avian pathogenic and faecal Escherichia coli isolated from meat chickens in Australia. Avian Pathology . pp. 1-32. ISSN 0307-9457

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Article Link(s): https://doi.org/10.1080/03079457.2022.2065969

Abstract

Globally, avian colibacillosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in poultry, associated with economic losses and welfare problems. Here, clinical avian pathogenic E. coli isolates (CEC; n=50) and faecal E. coli isolates from healthy (FEC; n=187) Australian meat chickens collected between 2006 and 2014 were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, phylogenetic grouping, plasmid replicon (PR) typing, multilocus sequence typing, and virulence gene (VG) profiling. Extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC)- and fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant E. coli isolates underwent further genetic characterisation. Significant proportions of CEC and FEC were respectively susceptible (13/50 [26%]; 48/187 [26%],) or MDR (9/50 [18%]; 26/187 [14%]) to 20 tested antimicrobials. Phylogenetic groups A and C, and PR types IncFIB and IncFrep were most commonly represented. Five tested CEC-associated VGs were more prevalent in CEC (≥90%) compared to FEC isolates (≤58%). Some isolates (CEC n=3; FEC n=7) were resistant to ESCs and/or FQs and possessed signature mutations in chromosomal FQ target genes and plasmid-mediated qnrS, blaCMY-2, and blaDHA-1 genes. Sequence type 354 (n=4), associated with extraintestinal infections in a broad range of hosts, was prevalent among the ESC- and/or FQ-resistant FEC.This study confirmed the existence of a small reservoir of ESC- and FQ-resistant E. coli in Australian commercial meat chickens despite the absence of use in the industry of these drug classes. Otherwise, a diversity of VGs and PR types in both faecal and clinical E. coli populations were identified. It?s hypothesised that the source of ESC- and FQ-resistant E. coli may be external to poultry production facilities.Highlights1. Low-level resistance to older and newer generation antimicrobial drugs detected2. The most common sequence type (ST) associated with FQ resistance was ST354 (4/10)3. A small proportion of CEC (n=3) and FEC (n=7) were resistant to ESCs and/or FQs

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Biosecurity Queensland
Keywords:avian colibacillosis Antimicrobial resistance Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli Avian faecal E. coli Extended-spectrum cephalosporins Fluoroquinolones Phylogenetic groups Plasmid replicon Poultry, Resistance gene, and Virulence gene
Subjects:Animal culture > Poultry
Animal culture > Poultry > Chickens
Veterinary medicine > Veterinary microbiology
Veterinary medicine > Veterinary bacteriology
Veterinary medicine > Communicable diseases of animals (General)
Veterinary medicine > Veterinary pathology
Deposited On:05 May 2022 00:49
Last Modified:05 May 2022 00:49

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