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Long term trends in fertility of soils under continuous cultivation and cereal cropping in southern Queensland. I. Overall changes in soil properties and trends in winter cereal yields

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Dalal, R.C. and Mayer, R. J. (1986) Long term trends in fertility of soils under continuous cultivation and cereal cropping in southern Queensland. I. Overall changes in soil properties and trends in winter cereal yields. Soil Research, 24 (2). pp. 265-279.

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Article Link(s): https://doi.org/10.1071/SR9860265

Publisher URL: https://www.publish.csiro.au/paper/SR9860265

Abstract

Changes in fertility of some southern Queensland soils resulting from extended periods of cultivation are presented, together with trends in yields of winter cereals on these soils. Six major soils of the cereal-belt, cropped for maximum periods of 20-70 years were examined. These were: Black earths, Waco soil; grey, brown and red clays (brigalow), Langlands-Logie soil; grey, brown and red clays (poplar box), Cecilvale soil; grey, brown and red clays (belah), Billa Billa soil; grey, brown and red clays (coolibah), Thallon soil; red earths, Riverview soil. Organic matter and its constituents, especially total organic C, organic C in the light fraction, total N and mineralizable N, were affected most by cultivation, showing decreases of 19-67% overall. Other soil properties probably associated with organic matter, including bulk density and DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) extractable manganese, were also significantly affected by cultivation in all soils. Soil properties affected least by cultivation were concentrations of inorganic phosphorus, total and exchangeable potassium, calcium carbonate, and dithionite extractable iron and aluminium. Most other soil properties studied (organic P, total sulfur, pH, exchangeable magnesium and sodium, exchangeable sodium percentage, and oxalate-extractable iron and aluminium) were affected by cultivation in at least four soils. Four factors accounted for 70% of the total variation among the 45 soil properties considered. They appeared to represent organic matter, clay colloids, iron and aluminium oxides, and soluble salts. Dry matter yield and/or N uptake of winter cereal crops (wheat and barley) measured in 1983 showed significant decreasing trends with period of cultivation in all soils.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Crop and Food Science, Animal Science
Additional Information:Reproduced with permission from © CSIRO Publishing. Access to published version is available via Publisher’s website.
Subjects:Agriculture > Agriculture (General) > Soils. Soil science > Soil and crops. Soil-plant relationships. Soil productivity
Agriculture > Agriculture (General) > Methods and systems of culture. Cropping systems
Agriculture > Agriculture (General) > Soil conservation and protection
Plant culture > Field crops > Wheat
Agriculture > By region or country > Australia > Queensland
Deposited On:20 Jan 2022 02:28
Last Modified:20 Jan 2022 02:28

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