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Integrated control of the mealybug Phenacoccus solenopsis (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) in Australian cotton with insecticides and naturally occurring beneficial arthropods

Sequeira, R. V., Reid, D. J. and Khan, M. (2021) Integrated control of the mealybug Phenacoccus solenopsis (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) in Australian cotton with insecticides and naturally occurring beneficial arthropods. Austral Entomology, n/a (n/a). ISSN 2052-174X

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Article Link(s): https://doi.org/10.1111/aen.12578

Publisher URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/aen.12578

Abstract

Abstract Insecticidal treatment options based on putative integrated pest management (IPM) compatible active ingredients spirotetramat, sulfoxaflor and buprofezin were evaluated for efficacy against first and second instar (small) and large (third instar and adult) cotton mealybugs, Phenacoccus solenopsis. Four field evaluations were conducted at the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Queensland) research station facilities at Kingaroy (KRS) and Emerald (ERS) in 2016 and 2017. Two ‘insecticide evaluations’ included treatment options with different rates of active ingredients and adjuvants, aimed at validating efficacy results obtained in previous glasshouse evaluations. The other two ‘IPM evaluations’ were designed to test the compatibility of selected insecticidal active ingredients with naturally occurring beneficial arthropods through differential exclusion by means of large field cages configured to be either partially open or fully closed to regulate access. Spirotetramat gave consistent and commercially acceptable (≥80%) control of large and small mealybugs at the highest rate of 96 g in these insecticide evaluations. The addition of crop oil to spirotetramat as a tank mix partner significantly enhanced efficacy, as documented previously in glasshouse evaluations. Sulfoxaflor provided equivalent control of large and small mealybugs but only at the ERS site. The overall control efficacy of buprofezin was equivalent to spirotetramat and sulfoxaflor at the ERS site but inferior to both at the KRS site. In the IPM evaluations, the abundance of predatory arthropods and their potential contribution to overall mortality was generally low. Parasitism contributed significantly to overall mortality among treatments over time and was independent of cage status (closed or open). Large mealybugs were equitably distributed between the upper (terminal) and lower sections of the cotton plant canopy in both ERS evaluations whereas in the KRS evaluations the distribution was biased towards the lower section. The importance of pest distribution within the crop canopy in the context of insecticide efficacy is discussed. The results of this study confirm the importance of spirotetramat, sulfoxaflor and buprofezin as key insecticidal platforms that will give growers and crop managers the flexibility and confidence to implement sustainable, multi-pest IPM strategies in Australian cotton.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Crop and Food Science, Animal Science
Subjects:Plant culture > Field crops > Textile and fibre plants
Plant pests and diseases
Plant pests and diseases > Pest control and treatment of diseases. Plant protection
Plant pests and diseases > Pest control and treatment of diseases. Plant protection > Organic plant protection. Biological control
Deposited On:07 Dec 2021 04:30
Last Modified:07 Dec 2021 04:30

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