Login | Request Account (DAF staff only)

High-Throughput Phenotyping of Dynamic Canopy Traits Associated with Stay-Green in Grain Sorghum

View Altmetrics

Liedtke, J. D., Hunt, C. H., George-Jaeggli, B., Laws, K., Watson, J., Potgieter, A. B., Cruickshank, A. and Jordan, D. R. (2020) High-Throughput Phenotyping of Dynamic Canopy Traits Associated with Stay-Green in Grain Sorghum. Plant Phenomics, 2020 . p. 4635153.

[img]
Preview
PDF
1MB

Article Link(s): https://doi.org/10.34133/2020/4635153

Abstract

Drought is a recurring phenomenon that puts crop yields at risk and threatens the livelihoods of many people around the globe. Stay-green is a drought adaption phenotype found in sorghum and other cereals. Plants expressing this phenotype show less drought-induced senescence and maintain functional green leaves for longer when water limitation occurs during grain fill, conferring benefits in both yield per se and harvestability. The physiological causes of the phenotype are postulated to be water saving through mechanisms such as reduced canopy size or access to extra water through mechanisms such as deeper roots. In sorghum breeding programs, stay-green has traditionally been assessed by comparing visual scores of leaf senescence either by identifying final leaf senescence or by estimating rate of leaf senescence. In this study, we compared measurements of canopy dynamics obtained from remote sensing on two sorghum breeding trials to stay-green values (breeding values) obtained from visual leaf senescence ratings in multienvironment breeding trials to determine which components of canopy development were most closely linked to the stay-green phenotype. Surprisingly, canopy size as estimated using preflowering canopy parameters was weakly correlated with stay-green values for leaf senescence while postflowering canopy parameters showed a much stronger association with leaf senescence. Our study suggests that factors other than canopy size have an important role in the expression of a stay-green phenotype in grain sorghum and further that the use of UAVs with multispectral sensors provides an excellent way of measuring canopy traits of hundreds of plots grown in large field trials.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Crop and Food Science
Additional Information:Open access
Subjects:Science > Botany > Genetics
Plant culture > Food crops
Plant culture > Field crops > Sorghum
Deposited On:22 Sep 2020 02:07
Last Modified:24 Sep 2020 01:10

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics