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Novel Sources of Resistance to Root-Lesion Nematode (Pratylenchus thornei) in a New Collection of Wild Cicer Species (C. reticulatum and C. echinospermum) to Improve Resistance in Cultivated Chickpea (C. arietinum)

Reen, R. A., Mumford, M. H. and Thompson, J. P. (2019) Novel Sources of Resistance to Root-Lesion Nematode (Pratylenchus thornei) in a New Collection of Wild Cicer Species (C. reticulatum and C. echinospermum) to Improve Resistance in Cultivated Chickpea (C. arietinum). Phytopathology, 109 (7). pp. 1270-1279. ISSN 0031949X (ISSN)

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Article Link(s): https://doi.org/10.1094/PHYTO-02-19-0047-R

Publisher URL: https://apsjournals.apsnet.org/doi/10.1094/PHYTO-02-19-0047-R

Abstract

Pratylenchus thornei, a nematode species that feeds and reproduces in chickpea (Cicer arietinum) roots, is widespread throughout the Mediterranean basin and Indian subcontinent. In Australia, it can cause yield losses up to approximately 25% of intolerant chickpea cultivars. Potential for improvement has been hindered by the narrow genetic diversity of cultivated chickpea and a limited world collection of original wild Cicer spp. in the primary gene pool, consisting of 18 C. reticulatum and 10 C. echinospermum accessions. Recently, collections of C. reticulatum and C. echinospermum from Turkey have substantially increased the number of accessions. This study evaluated 133 C. reticulatum and 41 C. echinospermum accessions from the new collection for resistance to P. thornei under controlled conditions in repeated glasshouse pot experiments. The aim of the study was to identify accessions with resistance superior to that currently available in Australian germplasm. Both wild Cicer spp. were found, on average, to be more resistant to P. thornei (P < 0.001) than C. arietinum. Combined analyses across experiments to determine genetic rankings showed that 13 (7%) wild accessions were significantly more resistant than the most resistant C. echinospermum reference ILWC 246, while another 40 (23%) accessions were significantly more resistant than the least susceptible Australian chickpea cultivar PBA Seamer. Mean P. thornei population densities differed significantly between collection sites in Turkey and within each of the genetic population groups. The sites Kayatepe and Baristepe1, and genetic population groups Ret_A and Ret_F associated with sites Oyali and Baristepe1, produced the lowest P. thornei population densities. This is the first report assessing the resistance to P. thornei of this new collection which offers novel sources of P. thornei resistance and untapped genetic diversity valuable for international chickpea breeding programs to exploit.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Crop and Food Science
Keywords:disease control and pest management genetics and resistance nematology root biomass root-lesion nematode wheat wild chickpea
Subjects:Science > Botany > Genetics
Plant culture > Field crops
Plant pests and diseases
Plant pests and diseases > Pest control and treatment of diseases. Plant protection
Deposited On:06 Feb 2020 00:47
Last Modified:06 Feb 2020 00:47

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