Login | Request Account (DAF staff only)

Latitudinal variation in growth rates and limited movement patterns revealed for east-coast snapper Chrysophrys auratus through long-term cooperative-tagging programs

View Altmetrics

Stewart, J., Pidd, A., Fowler, A. M. and Sumpton, W. (2019) Latitudinal variation in growth rates and limited movement patterns revealed for east-coast snapper Chrysophrys auratus through long-term cooperative-tagging programs. Marine and Freshwater Research .

Full text not currently attached. Access may be available via the Publisher's website or OpenAccess link.

Article Link(s): https://doi.org/10.1071/MF19138

Publisher URL: https://www.publish.csiro.au/paper/MF19138

Abstract

Understanding the spatial ecology of exploited fish stocks is key to their sustainable management. Here we used a long-term cooperative tag and recapture dataset that encompassed the entire distribution of the stock to examine patterns of movement and growth of Chrysophrys auratus (Sparidae) along eastern Australia. More than 24 000 individuals were tagged, with 2117 being recaptured with information suitable for analysis of movements and 1440 with information suitable for analysis of growth rates. Individuals ranged in size between 120- and 620-mm fork length at tagging and were at liberty for up to 5.9 years before being recaptured. Results indicated population characteristics of partial migration, whereby the majority (~71%) of fish did not move any detectable distance and a small proportion (~4%) moved between 100 and 1000 km. Specific growth rates were significantly affected by the latitude at tagging, with higher growth rates at lower (more northern) latitudes. Our findings suggest that Australian east-coast C. auratus are mainly resident on a subdecadal time scale and at reasonably small spatial scales. When considered with information on latitudinal variation in growth and reproductive biology, localised recruitment and a history of localised fishery declines, assessment and management at local scales may be appropriate.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Animal Science
Keywords:fisheries, life history, partial migration.
Subjects:Aquaculture and Fisheries > Fisheries > Fishery resources
Aquaculture and Fisheries > Fisheries > Fishery conservation
Aquaculture and Fisheries > Fisheries > Fishery research
Deposited On:12 Nov 2019 01:00
Last Modified:12 Nov 2019 01:00

Repository Staff Only: item control page