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Resting strategies for recovery of pasture

Jones, Paul and Johnstone, Carly (2017) Resting strategies for recovery of pasture. In: 19th Biennial Conference of the Australian Rangeland Society, 25 to 28 September 2017, Port Augusta, South Australia.

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Article Link(s): https://www.austrangesoc.com.au/data/ARSC2017/2017...

Abstract

Reduced condition of pasture and soil is common in pasture communities across northern Australia where desirable perennial grasses are the cornerstone for profitable and sustainable beef production. Resting pasture from grazing over the summer growing season is a key grazing land management recommendation. Trials to quantify the response of native pastures to differing resting regimes were conducted. Two sites with poor condition grazing land in priority pasture communities in central and north Queensland, Australia were studied. Detailed recordings were made on plant lifecycles, pasture attributes and soil seed banks.
The recovery of 3P (palatable, perennial, productive) grasses appears to be limited by a small viable seedbank. Resting management to achieve pasture recovery will require time frames in the order of 10 years before there will be an obvious impact on land condition and productivity. A moderate stocking rate when grazing is necessary for these improvements to accrue. During drought, adjusting stock numbers to the amount of forage available is critical to avoid reducing land condition and further prolonging recovery. Other essential management includes stocking around long-term carrying capacity, and avoiding high grazing pressure on the paddocks around the rested paddock.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Business groups:Animal Science
Keywords:resting, perennial grass dynamics, land management
Subjects:Agriculture > Agriculture (General) > Special aspects of agriculture as a whole > Sustainable agriculture
Agriculture > Agriculture (General) > Agricultural conservation
Animal culture > Rangelands. Range management. Grazing
Deposited On:08 Nov 2017 03:01
Last Modified:08 Nov 2017 03:01

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