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Lessons learned from the virus indexing of Musa germplasm: insights from a multiyear collaboration

De Clerck, C. and Crew, K. and Van den houwe, I. and McMichael, L. and Berhal, C. and Lassois, L. and Haissam Jijakli, M. and Roux, N. and Thomas, J. and Massart, S. (2017) Lessons learned from the virus indexing of Musa germplasm: insights from a multiyear collaboration. Annals of Applied Biology, 171 (1). pp. 15-27. ISSN 1744-7348

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aab.12353

Abstract

The Bioversity International Transit Center (ITC) for banana hosts more than 1500 accessions largely covering the genetic diversity of the genus Musa. Its objective is to conserve this genetic diversity and to supply plant materials to users worldwide. All the Musa accessions must be tested for virus presence and, if infected, virus elimination must be attempted, to enable the supply of virus-free plant material. An international collaborative effort launched under the auspices of Bioversity International (2007–2013) finally led to the implementation of a two-step process to test the accessions. The first step, called pre-indexing, involved only molecular tests and was designed as a pre-screen of new germplasm lines or existing accessions to reduce the need for post-entry virus therapy and repeated virus indexing. The second step, called full indexing, was performed on either older existing accessions or newer accessions which tested negative during pre-indexing, and involved molecular tests, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and symptom observation. In total, 270 germplasm lines (434 samples) were pre-indexed; while full indexing was carried out on 243 accessions (68 of which had been pre-indexed). A significant proportion of the samples tested during pre-indexing was infected with at least one virus (68%), showing the utility of this early pre-screening step. Banana streak OL virus and Banana mild mosaic virus were the most commonly detected viruses during both pre- and full indexing. For 22 accessions, viral particles were observed by TEM in full indexing while the molecular tests were negative, underlining the importance of combining various detection techniques. After full indexing, viruses were not detected in 166 accessions, which were then released for international distribution from the ITC. This publication exemplifies how the practical application of diagnostic protocols can raise fundamental questions related to their appropriate use in routine practice and the need for their continuous monitoring and improvement after their first publication.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Horticulture and Forestry Science
Keywords:Banana viruses diagnostic test virus indexing phytosanitary certification molecular diagnostic electron microscopy virus miniprep
Subjects:Science > Botany > Genetics
Plant culture > Fruit and fruit culture > Culture of individual fruits or types of fruit > Bananas
Plant pests and diseases
Plant pests and diseases > Plant pathology
Deposited On:27 Jun 2017 04:23
Last Modified:27 Jun 2017 04:23

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