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Thermo-alkaline Treatment as a Practical Degradation Strategy To Reduce Indospicine Contamination in Camel Meat

Tan, Eddie T. T. and Yong, Ken W. L. and Wong, Siew-Hoon and D’Arcy, Bruce R. and Al Jassim, Rafat and De Voss, James J. and Fletcher, Mary T. (2016) Thermo-alkaline Treatment as a Practical Degradation Strategy To Reduce Indospicine Contamination in Camel Meat. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 64 (44). pp. 8447-8453. ISSN 0021-8561

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.6b03499

Abstract

Ingestion of indospicine-contaminated camel and horse meat has caused fatal liver injury to dogs in Australia, and it is currently not known if such contaminated meat may pose a human health risk upon dietary exposure. To date, indospicine-related research has tended to focus on analytical aspects, with little information on post-harvest management of indospicine-contaminated meat. In this study, indospicine degradation was investigated in both aqueous solution and also contaminated meat, under a range of conditions. Aqueous solutions of indospicine and indospicine-contaminated camel meat were microwaved (180 °C) or autoclaved (121 °C) with the addition of food-grade additives [0.05% (v/v) acetic acid or 0.05% (w/v) sodium bicarbonate] for 0, 15, 30, and 60 min. An aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution demonstrated the greatest efficacy in degrading indospicine, with complete degradation after 15 min of heating in a microwave or autoclave; concomitant formation of indospicine degradation products, namely, 2-aminopimelamic and 2-aminopimelic acids, was observed. Similar treatment of indospicine-contaminated camel meat with aqueous sodium bicarbonate resulted in 50% degradation after 15 min of heating in an autoclave and 100% degradation after 15 min of heating in a microwave. The results suggest that thermo-alkaline aqueous treatment has potential as a pragmatic post-harvest handling technique in reducing indospicine levels in indospicine-contaminated meat.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Biosecurity Queensland
Subjects:Science > Invasive Species > Animals
Animal culture
Veterinary medicine > Veterinary toxicology
Deposited On:19 Jan 2017 02:53
Last Modified:20 Feb 2017 02:53

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