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Echinococcus granulosus and other zoonotic pathogens of peri-urban wild dogs in South-east Queensland

Harriott, Lana and Gentle, Matthew and Traub, Rebecca J. and Soares-Magalhaes, Ricardo and Cobbold, Rowland N. (2016) Echinococcus granulosus and other zoonotic pathogens of peri-urban wild dogs in South-east Queensland. In: 5th Queensland Pest Animal Symposium, Townsville.

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Abstract

Wild dogs are commonly found within urban and peri-urban zones of northeastern Australia. They traverse close distances to human dwellings, frequently visit household backyards, and utilise common or public-use areas such as school grounds and parklands. Their close geographical proximity and interactions with people and pets suggests a potential for transmission of pathogens of public health significance. Although wild dogs are capable of harbouring zoonotic pathogens, their prevalence and any associated risk factors remain largely unknown and unexplored. Infection indicators on targeted zoonotic diseases in peri-urban wild dogs have been investigated utilising faecal samples, blood samples and whole dog cadavers provided from council management programs within northeast New South Wales and southeast Queensland. Necropsy, microbiological and molecular methods were used to detect and identify pathogens. Our results suggest Echinococcus granulosus to be the most common pathogen carried by peri-urban dogs (51%, n=201) followed by Spirometra erinacei, Hookworms, Toxocara canis, and Taenia spp. at 36%, 27%, 5.4%, and 4.5%, respectively. The proportion of the variance in prevalence in E. granulosus accountable to geographical proximity is 14% with clusters of infection identified within 8.9km. Other risk factors that influence the presence of E. granulosus have been identified. These investigations will provide insights to the potential public health risks from pathogens carried by wild dogs, and ultimately aim to inform and shape management programs for wild dogs in peri-urban areas.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Business groups:Biosecurity Queensland
Subjects:Science > Invasive Species > Animals
Veterinary medicine > Communicable diseases of animals (General)
Veterinary medicine > Veterinary pathology
Deposited On:18 Jan 2017 01:43
Last Modified:18 Jan 2017 01:43

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