Login | Create Account (DAF staff only)

Measuring nitrous oxide emissions from conventional and controlled release fertilisers in south-east Queensland pineapple production

Nicholls, Z.A. and Price, S.D. (2016) Measuring nitrous oxide emissions from conventional and controlled release fertilisers in south-east Queensland pineapple production. Acta Horticulturae (1111). pp. 169-176. ISSN 0567-7572

Full text not currently attached. Access may be available via the Publisher's website or OpenAccess link.

Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2016.1111.25

Abstract

Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential 298 times higher than carbon dioxide. Soils are a natural source of N2O, contributing 65% of global emissions. This paper is the first in Australia to measure and compare N2O emissions from pre-plant controlled release (CR) and conventional granular (CV) fertilisers in pineapple production using static PVC chambers to capture N2O emissions. Farm 1 cumulative emissions from the CR fertiliser were 3.22 kg ha-1 compared to 6.09 kg ha-1 produced by the CV. At farm 2 the CV blend emitted 2.36 kg ha-1 in comparison to the CR blend of 2.92 kg ha-1. Daily N2O flux rates showed a relationship of direct response to rainfall and soil moisture availability. High emissions were observed for wheel tracks where increased N2O emissions may be linked to soil compaction and waterlogging that creates anaerobic conditions after rain events. Emission measurements over three months highlighted the inconsistencies found in other studies relative to reducing emissions through controlled release nitrogen. More investigations are required to verify the benefits associated with controlled release fertiliser use in pineapples, placement and seasonal timing to address N2O emissions in pineapples.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Horticulture and Forestry Science
Subjects:Agriculture > Agriculture (General) > Soils. Soil science > Soil chemistry
Agriculture > Agriculture (General) > Soils. Soil science > Soil and crops. Soil-plant relationships. Soil productivity
Agriculture > Agriculture (General) > Fertilisers
Deposited On:30 May 2016 04:25
Last Modified:30 May 2016 04:25

Repository Staff Only: item control page