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An exploratory study to assess the activity of the acarine growth inhibitor, fluazuron, against Sarcoptes scabei infestation in pigs

Pasay, C. and Rothwell, J. and Mounsey, K. and Kelly, A. and Hutchinson, B. and Miezler, A. and McCarthy, J. (2012) An exploratory study to assess the activity of the acarine growth inhibitor, fluazuron, against Sarcoptes scabei infestation in pigs. Parasites & Vectors, 5 . ISSN 1756-3305

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1756-3305-5-40

Abstract

Background: The most common treatments for scabies in human and veterinary settings are topical 5% permethrin or systemic treatment with ivermectin. However, these treatments have very little activity against arthropod eggs, and therefore repeated treatment is frequently required. In-vitro, biochemical and molecular studies have demonstrated that human mites are becoming increasingly resistant to both acaricides. To identify alternate acaricides, we undertook a pilot study of the in vivo activity of the benzoylphenyl urea inhibitor of chitin synthesis, fluazuron, in pigs with sarcoptic mange. Findings: Pigs (n = 5) were infested with S. scabei var suis, and randomised to treatment at the start of peak infestation with fluazuron at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day per os for 7 days (n = 3) or no treatment (n = 2). Clinical scores, skin scrapings for mite counts and blood sampling for pharmacokinetic analysis were undertaken. Fluazuron was well absorbed in treated pigs with measureable blood levels up to 4 weeks post treatment. No adverse effects were observed. Modest acaricidal activity of the compound was observed, with a reduction in severity of skin lesions in treated pigs, as well as a reduction in number of scabies mite's early life stages. Conclusions: The moderate efficacy of fluazuron against scabies mites indicates a lead to the development of alternate treatments for scabies, such as combination therapies that maybe applicable for human use in the future.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Animal Science
Additional Information:Pasay, Cielo Rothwell, Jim Mounsey, Kate Kelly, Andrew Hutchinson, Beverly Miezler, Alon McCarthy, James
Subjects:Animal culture > Swine
Veterinary medicine > Communicable diseases of animals (General)
Deposited On:25 Feb 2014 05:57
Last Modified:25 Feb 2014 05:57

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