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Genetic variability in high temperature effects on seed-set in sorghum

Nguyen, C. T. and Singh, V. and van Oosterom, E. J. and Chapman, S. C. and Jordan, D. R. and Hammer, G. L. (2013) Genetic variability in high temperature effects on seed-set in sorghum. Functional Plant Biology, 40 (5). pp. 439-448. ISSN 1445-4408

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/FP12264

Publisher URL: http://www.publish.csiro.au/paper/FP12264.htm

Abstract

Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) is grown as a dryland crop in semiarid subtropical and tropical environments where it is often exposed to high temperatures around flowering. Projected climate change is likely to increase the incidence of exposure to high temperature, with potential adverse effects on growth, development and grain yield. The objectives of this study were to explore genetic variability for the effects of high temperature on crop growth and development, in vitro pollen germination and seed-set. Eighteen diverse sorghum genotypes were grown at day : night temperatures of 32 : 21 degrees C (optimum temperature, OT) and 38 : 21 degrees C (high temperature, HT during the middle of the day) in controlled environment chambers. HT significantly accelerated development, and reduced plant height and individual leaf size. However, there was no consistent effect on leaf area per plant. HT significantly reduced pollen germination and seed-set percentage of all genotypes; under HT, genotypes differed significantly in pollen viability percentage (17-63%) and seed-set percentage (7-65%). The two traits were strongly and positively associated (R-2 = 0.93, n = 36, P < 0.001), suggesting a causal association. The observed genetic variation in pollen and seed-set traits should be able to be exploited through breeding to develop heat-tolerant varieties for future climates.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Crop and Food Science
Additional Information: Nguyen, Chuc T. Singh, Vijaya van Oosterom, Erik J. Chapman, Scott C. Jordan, David R. Hammer, Graeme L. Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries [GMS-0335] We thank Terry Grant for his assistance in maintaining the controlled chamber facilities and setting up the experiment. This study was supported by a research grant (GMS-0335) from the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Csiro publishing Collingwood
Keywords:heat tolerance pollen germination seed set percentage chilling field temperatures vitro pollen germination ultraviolet-b radiation bicolor l. moench grain-sorghum carbon-dioxide leaf photosynthesis drought stress harvest index tube growth
Subjects:Science > Botany > Genetics
Plant culture > Field crops > Sorghum
Deposited On:17 Sep 2013 03:11
Last Modified:08 Aug 2017 14:48

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