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Lack of release of bound anthocyanins and phenolic acids from carrot plant cell walls and model composites during simulated gastric and small intestinal digestion

Padayachee, A. and Netzel, G. and Netzel, M. and Day, L. and Mikkelsen, D. and Gidley, M. J. (2013) Lack of release of bound anthocyanins and phenolic acids from carrot plant cell walls and model composites during simulated gastric and small intestinal digestion. Food & Function, 4 (6). pp. 906-916. ISSN 2042-6496

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2012.02.082

Publisher URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308814612002701

Abstract

Separately, polyphenols and plant cell walls (PCW) are important contributors to the health benefits associated with fruits and vegetables. However, interactions with PCW which occur either during food preparation or mastication may affect bioaccessibility and hence bioavailability of polyphenols. Binding interactions between anthocyanins, phenolic acids (PAs) and PCW components, were evaluated using both a bacterial cellulose-pectin model system and a black carrot puree system. The majority of available polyphenols bound to PCW material with 60-70% of available anthocyanins and PAs respectively binding to black carrot puree PCW matter. Once bound, release of polyphenols using acidified methanol is low with only similar to 20% of total anthocyanins to similar to 30% of PAs being released. Less than 2% of bound polyphenol was released after in vitro gastric and small intestinal (S.I.) digestion for both the model system and the black carrot puree PCW matter. Confocal laser scanning microscopy shows localised binding of anthocyanins to PCW. Very similar patterns of binding for anthocyanins and PAs suggest that PAs form complexes with anthocyanins and polysaccharides. Time dependent changes in extractability with acidified methanol but not the total bound fraction suggests that initial nonspecific deposition on cellulose surfaces is followed by rearrangement of the bound molecules. Minimal release of anthocyanins and PAs after simulated gastric and S.I. digestion indicates that polyphenols in fruits and vegetables which bind to the PCW will be transported to the colon where they would be expected to be released by the action of cell wall degrading bacteria.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Biosecurity Queensland
Keywords:dietary fiber cardiovascular health apple polyphenols bioavailability quantification antioxidants red absorption excretion ileostomy
Subjects:Science > Botany > Plant physiology
Deposited On:28 Oct 2013 03:58
Last Modified:28 Oct 2013 03:58

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