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Allocasuarina tree hosts determine the spatial distribution of hypogeous fungal sporocarps in three tropical Australian sclerophyll forests

Abell-Davis, S. E. and Gadek, P. A. and Pearce, C. A. and Congdon, B. C. (2012) Allocasuarina tree hosts determine the spatial distribution of hypogeous fungal sporocarps in three tropical Australian sclerophyll forests. Mycologia, 104 (5). pp. 1008-1019. ISSN 0027-5514

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/11-416

Abstract

Across three tropical Australian sclerophyll forest types, site-specific environmental variables could explain the distribution of both quantity (abundance and biomass) and richness (genus and species) of hypogeous fungi sporocarps. Quantity was significantly higher in the Allocasuarina forest sites that had high soil nitrogen but low phosphorous. Three genera of hypogeous fungi were found exclusively in Allocasuarina forest sites including Gummiglobus, Labyrinthomyces and Octaviania, as were some species of Castoreum, Chondrogaster, Endogone, Hysterangium and Russula. However, the forest types did not all group according to site-scale variables and subsequently the taxonomic assemblages were not significantly different between the three forest types. At site scale, significant negative relationships were found between phosphorous concentration and the quantity of hypogeous fungi sporocarps. Using a multivariate information theoretic approach, there were other more plausible models to explain the patterns of sporocarp richness. Both the mean number of fungal genera and species increased with the number of Allocasuarina stems, at the same time decreasing with the number of Eucalyptus stems. The optimal conditions for promoting hypogeous fungi sporocarp quantity and sporocarp richness appear to be related to the presence and abundance of Allocasuarina (Casuarinaceae) host trees. Allocasuarina tree species may have a higher host receptivity for ectomycorrhizal hypogeous fungi species that provide an important food resource for Australian mycophagous animals.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Biosecurity Queensland
Additional Information:Biosecurity Queensland
Subjects:Forestry
Deposited On:11 Nov 2013 04:45
Last Modified:11 Nov 2013 04:45

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