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Multiple host use by a sap-sucking membracid: population consequences of nymphal development on primary and secondary host plant species

Manners, A. and Walter, G. (2009) Multiple host use by a sap-sucking membracid: population consequences of nymphal development on primary and secondary host plant species. Arthropod-Plant Interactions, 3 (2). pp. 87-98.

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11829-009-9059-6

Publisher URL: http://www.springerlink.com

Abstract

Aconophora compressa is a gregarious, sap-sucking insect that uses multiple host plant species. Nymphal host plant species (and variety) significantly affected nymphal survival, nymphal development rate and the subsequent size and fecundity of adults, with fiddlewood ( Citharexylum spinosum ) being significantly best in all respects. Nymphs that developed on a relatively poor host ( Duranta erecta var “geisha girl”) and which were moved to fiddlewood as adults laid significantly fewer eggs (mean ± SE = 836 ± 130) than those that developed solely on fiddlewood (1,329 ± 105). Adults on geisha girl, regardless of having been reared as nymphs on fiddlewood or geisha girl, laid significantly fewer eggs (342 ± 83 and 317 ± 74, respectively) than adults on fiddlewood. A simple model that incorporates host plant related survival, development rate and fecundity suggests that the population dynamics of A. compressa are governed mainly by fiddlewood, the primary host. The results have general implications for understanding the population dynamics of herbivores that use multiple host plant species, and also for the way in which weed biological control host testing methods should be conducted.

Item Type:Article
Corporate Creators:Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry. Qld (DAFF), Agri-Science, Horticulture and Forestry Science , The University of Queensland, School of Biological Sciences
Business groups:Agri-Science, Horticulture and Forestry Science
Additional Information:© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.
Keywords:Aconophora compressa; iological control; fiddlewood; lantana; polyphagy; reciprocal host plant transfer.
Subjects:Science > Zoology > Invertebrates > Insects
Plant pests and diseases
Deposited On:23 Jul 2012 05:34
Last Modified:08 Aug 2017 14:59

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