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Economic modelling of grazing systems in the Fitzroy and Burdekin catchments

Star, M. and Donaghy, P. (2010) Economic modelling of grazing systems in the Fitzroy and Burdekin catchments. Project Report. Queensland Department of Employment Economic Development and Innovation.

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Article URL: http://www.fba.org.au/downloads/P2R-grazing-report.pdf

Abstract

The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is the largest reef system in the world; it covers an area of approximately 2,225,000 km² in the northern Queensland continental shelf. There are approximately 750 reefs that exist within 40 km of the Queensland coast. Recent research has identified that poor water quality is having negative impacts on the GBR (Haynes et al. 2007). The Fitzroy Basin covers 143,000 km² and is the largest catchment draining into the GBR as well as being one of the largest catchments in Australia (Karfs et al. 2009). The Burdekin Catchment is the second largest catchment entering into the GBR and covers 133,432 km².The prime determinant for the changes in water quality entering into the GBR have been attributed to grazing, with beef production the largest single land use industry comprising 90% of the land area (Karfs et al. 2009). Extensive beef production contributes over $1 billion dollars to the national economy annually and employs over 9000 people, many in rural communities (Gordon 2007).

‘Economic modelling of grazing systems in the Fitzroy and Burdekin catchments’ was a joint project with the Fitzroy Basin Association and the Queensland Department of Employment Economic Development and Innovation. The project was formed under the federally funded Caring For Our Country and the Reef Rescue programs. The project objectives were as follows;

* Quantifying the costs of over-utilising available pasture and the resulting sediment leaving a representative farm for four of the major land systems in the Burdekin or Fitzroy catchments and identifying economically optimal pasture utilisation rates

* Estimating the cost of reducing pasture utilisation rates below the determined optimal

* Using this information, guide the selection of appropriate tools to achieve reduced utilisation rates e.g. extension process versus incentive payments or a combination of both

* Model the biophysical and economic impacts of altering grazing systems to restore land condition e.g. from C condition to B condition for four land systems in the Burdekin or Fitzroy catchments.

Item Type:Monograph (Project Report)
Funders:Report to the Fitzroy Basin Association through funding from the Australian Government’s, Caring for our Country and the Reef Rescue programs.
Corporate Creators:Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI), Agriculture and Food
Projects:Was a joint project with the Fitzroy Basin Association and the Queensland Department of Employment Economic De
Additional Information:© The State of Queensland, Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation, 2010.
Keywords:Economic modelling; grazing systems; regeneration; pastures; trees; soil surface dynamics; sediment reductions; water quality; the Great Barrier Reef; Queensland.
Subjects:Animal culture > Rangelands. Range management. Grazing
Agriculture > Agriculture (General) > Agriculture and the environment
Deposited On:20 Feb 2012 06:15
Last Modified:11 Oct 2017 04:13

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