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Early harvest and ensilage of forage sorghum infected with ergot (Claviceps africana) reduces the risk of livestock poisoning.

Blaney, B.J. and Ryley, M.J. and Boucher, B.D. (2010) Early harvest and ensilage of forage sorghum infected with ergot (Claviceps africana) reduces the risk of livestock poisoning. Australian Veterinary Journal, 88 (8). pp. 311-312. ISSN 0005-0423

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-0813.2010.00590.x

Publisher URL: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com

Abstract

Sorghum ergot produces dihydroergosine (DHES) and related alkaloids, which cause hyperthermia in cattle. Proportions of infected panicles (grain heads), leaves and stems were determined in two forage sorghum crops extensively infected 2 to 4 weeks prior to sampling and the panicles were assayed for DHES. Composite samples from each crop, plus a third grain variety crop, were coarsely chopped and half of each sealed in plastic buckets for 6 weeks to simulate ensilation. The worst-infected panicles contained up to 55 mg DHES/kg, but dilution reduced average concentrations of DHES in crops to approximately 1 mg/kg, a relatively safe level for cattle. Ensilation significantly (P = 0.043) reduced mean DHES concentrations from 0.85 to 0.46 mg/kg.

Item Type:Article
Corporate Creators:Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI), Agri-Science, Crop and Food Science
Business groups:Agri-Science, Crop and Food Science
Additional Information:© John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Keywords:Cattle; Ergot alkaloid; mycotoxin; silage; sorghum ergot; pathogen; feed.
Subjects:Veterinary medicine > Veterinary mycology
Plant pests and diseases > Individual or types of plants or trees > Sorghum
Animal culture > Cattle
Deposited On:25 Oct 2010 06:27
Last Modified:11 Oct 2011 07:08

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