Login | Create Account (DAF staff only)

Resistance of Brassicaceae plants to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne spp.) in northern Australia

Pattison, A.B. and Versteeg, C. and Akiew, S. and Kirkegaard, J. (2006) Resistance of Brassicaceae plants to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne spp.) in northern Australia. International Journal of Pest Management, 52 (1). pp. 53-62.

Full text not currently attached. Access may be available via the Publisher's website or OpenAccess link.

Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09670870500424375

Publisher URL: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/alphalist.asp

Abstract

Brassicaceae plants have the potential as part of an integrated approach to replace fumigant nematicides, providing the biofumigation response following their incorporation is not offset by reproduction of plant-parasitic nematodes on their roots. Forty-three Brassicaceae cultivars were screened in a pot trial for their ability to reduce reproduction of three root-knot nematode isolates from north Queensland, Australia: M. arenaria (NQ1), M. javanica (NQ2) and M. arenaria race 2 (NQ5/7). No cultivar was found to consistently reduce nematode reproduction relative to forage sorghum, the current industry standard, although a commercial fodder radish (Raphanus sativus) and a white mustard (Sinapis alba) line were consistently as resistant to the formation of galls as forage sorghum. A second pot trial screened five commercially available Brassicaceae cultivars, selected for their biofumigation potential, for resistance to two nematode species, M. javanica (NQ2) and M. arenaria (NQ5/7). The fodder radish cv. Weedcheck, was found to be as resistant as forage sorghum to nematode reproduction. A multivariate cluster analysis using the resistance measurements, gall index, nematode number per g of root and multiplication for two nematode species (NQ2 and NQ5/7) confirmed the similarity in resistance between the radish cultivar and forage sorghum. A field trial confirmed the resistance of the fodder radish cv. Weedcheck, with a similar reduction in the number of Meloidogyne spp. juveniles recovered from the roots 8 weeks after planting. The use of fodder radish cultivars as biofumigation crops to manage root-knot nematodes in tropical vegetable production systems deserves further investigation.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:© Taylor & Francis.
Keywords:Biofumigation; brassica; Meloidogyne arenaria; M. javanica; radish; Raphanus sativus; glucosinolate profiles; green manure; Javanica; soil; Isothiocyanates; suppression; crops; tissues; growth.
Subjects:Plant pests and diseases > Pest control and treatment of diseases. Plant protection
Plant culture > Field crops > Forage crops. Feed crops
Deposited On:02 Feb 2009 04:55
Last Modified:29 Mar 2011 01:32

Repository Staff Only: item control page