Login | Create Account (DAF staff only)

Odour Emissions from Tunnel Ventilated Poultry Housing

Gallagher, E.M. and Hudson, N.A. and Dunlop, M.W. and Parsci, G. and Sohn, J.H. and Atzeni, M.G. and Duperouzel, D. and Collman, G. and Nicholas, P. (2007) Odour Emissions from Tunnel Ventilated Poultry Housing. In: Proc. 14th International Union of Air Pollution Prevention and Environmental Protection Associations (IUAPPA) World Congress 2007, 18th Clean Air Society of Australia and New Zealand (CASANZ) Conference, September 9-13th, Brisbane, Australia.

Full text not currently attached. Access may be available via the Publisher's website or OpenAccess link.

Publisher URL: http://www.iuappa.com

Abstract

In Australia, factors such as local planning processes, urban encroachment into rural areas and intensification of the poultry industry have increased the potential for odour and dust nuisance. At present, accurate estimates of odour emissions from mechanically ventilated poultry housing systems do not exist for Australian conditions. This has made the poultry industry vulnerable to unsubstantiated criticism. Recently, the Australian poultry industry have made a significant investment in research to obtain accurate estimates of odour, dust and volatile chemical emission rates from typical poultry housing systems.

This paper describes the measurement of odour emissions from tunnel ventilated poultry housing systems in different climatic zones in Queensland and Victoria, Australia (humid sub-tropical and Mediterranean respectively) during two seasons (summer and winter). Samples were collected at defined intervals over typical batch production cycles to define the odour emission profiles. These samples were analysed using dynamic olfactometry according to the Australian Standard 4323.3 to derive the odour concentration values. Ventilation rates were measured concurrently, allowing the calculation of odour emission rates. Odour concentration and emission rates were assessed in terms of ventilation rate, ambient and shed air temperature and relative humidity and litter moisture status. Odour emission rates varied with bird age. Seasonal differences in odour emission rate were also observed.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Additional Information:© IUAPPA. © CASANZ.
Keywords:Odour; odour emission; poultry; ventilation rate.
Subjects:Animal culture > Housing and environmental control
Animal culture > Poultry > Chickens
Deposited On:20 Jan 2009 04:11
Last Modified:23 Jun 2011 01:39

Repository Staff Only: item control page