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Developing African mahogany (Khaya senegalensis) germplasm and its management for a sustainable forest plantation industry in northern Australia: Progress and needs.

Nikles, D.G. and Bevege, D.I. and Dickinson, G.R. and Griffiths, M.W. and Reilly, D.F. and Lee, D.J. (2008) Developing African mahogany (Khaya senegalensis) germplasm and its management for a sustainable forest plantation industry in northern Australia: Progress and needs. Australian Forestry, 71 (1). pp. 33-47.

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Article Link(s): http://www.forestry.org.au/pdf/pdf-public/conferen...

Publisher URL: http://www.forestry.org.au/ifa/c/c0-ifa.asp

Abstract

The demonstrated wide adaptability, substantial yield potential and proven timber quality of African mahogany (Khaya senegalensis) from plantings of the late 1960s and early 1970s in northern Australia have led to a resurgence of interest in this high-value species. New plantations or trials have been established in several regions since the early 1990s -in four regions in north Queensland, two in the Northern Territory and one in Western Australia. Overall, more than 1500 ha had been planted by early 2007, and the national annual planting from 2007-2008 as currently planned will exceed 2400 ha. Proceedings of two workshops have summarised information available on the species in northern Australia, and suggested research and development (R&D) needs and directions. After an unsustained first phase of domestication of K. senegalensis in the late 1960s to the early 1970s, a second phase began in northern Australia in 2001 focused on conservation and tree improvement that is expected to provide improved planting stock by 2010. Work on other aspects of domestication is also described in this paper: the current estate and plans for extension; site suitability, soils and nutrition; silviculture and management; productivity; pests and diseases; and log and wood properties of a sample of superior trees from two mature plantations of unselected material near Darwin. Some constraints on sustainable plantation development in all these fields are identified and R&D needs proposed. A sustained R&D effort will require a strategic coordinated approach, cooperative implementation and extra funding. Large gains in plantation profitability can be expected to flow from such inputs.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:© Institute of Foresters of Australia. Australian and New Zealand Institutes of Foresters (ANZIF) Conference Growing Forest Values, 3–7 June 2007, Coffs Harbour, NSW.
Keywords:African mahogany; Khaya senegalensis; tree improvement; clone tests; seed orchards; provenance; domestication; nutrition; soils; silviculture; stand establishment; stand management; productivity; pests; diseases; wood properties; R&D; research planning; plantations; tree breeding; northern Australia; Northern Territory; Queensland.
Subjects:Forestry
Deposited On:30 Oct 2008 05:39
Last Modified:07 Jun 2015 15:09

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