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Tree species diversity and ecosystem function: Can tropical multi-species plantations generate greater productivity?

Erskine, P.D. and Lamb, D. and Bristow, M. (2006) Tree species diversity and ecosystem function: Can tropical multi-species plantations generate greater productivity? Forest Ecology and Management, 233 (2-3). pp. 205-210.

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2006.05.013

Publisher URL: http://www.elsevier.com

Abstract

Results from the humid tropics of Australia demonstrate that diverse plantations can achieve greater productivity than monocultures. We found that increases in both the observed species number and the effective species richness were significantly related to increased levels of productivity as measured by stand basal area or mean individual tree basal area. Four of five plantation species were more productive in mixtures with other species than in monocultures, offering on average, a 55% increase in mean tree basal area. A general linear model suggests that species richness had a significant effect on mean individual tree basal area when environmental variables were included in the model. As monoculture plantations are currently the preferred reforestation method throughout the tropics these results suggest that significant productivity and ecological gains could be made if multi-species plantations are more broadly pursued.

Item Type:Article
Corporate Creators:Horticulture and Forestry Science
Additional Information:© Elsevier B.V.
Keywords:Agathis robusta; Araucaria cunninghamii; Eucalyptus cloeziana; E. pellita; E. tereticornis; mixed species; polyculture; monoculture.
Subjects:Forestry > Sylviculture
Forestry > Research. Experimentation
Deposited On:23 Oct 2008 02:32
Last Modified:29 Sep 2010 00:55

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