Login | Create Account (DAF staff only)

Field evaluation of a plant activator, captan, chlorothalonil, copper hydroxide, iprodione, mancozeb and strobilurins for the control of citrus brown spot of mandarin

Miles, A.K. and Willingham, S.L. and Cooke, A.W. (2005) Field evaluation of a plant activator, captan, chlorothalonil, copper hydroxide, iprodione, mancozeb and strobilurins for the control of citrus brown spot of mandarin. Australasian Plant Pathology, 34 (1). pp. 63-71.

[img]
Preview
PDF
130kB

Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AP04085

Publisher URL: http://www.publish.csiro.au/

Abstract

Brown spot (caused by Alternaria alternata) is a major disease of citrus in subtropical areas of Australia. A number of chemicals, the strobilurins azoxystrobin, trifloxystrobin, pyraclostrobin and methoxycrylate, a plant activator (acibenzolar), copper hydroxide, mancozeb, captan, iprodione and chlorothalonil/pyrimthanil were tested in the field for its control. Over three seasons, trees in a commercial orchard received 16, 14 and 7 fungicide sprays, respectively, commencing at flowering in the first season, and petal fall in the later seasons. In all experiments, the strobilurins used alone, or incorporated with copper and mancozeb, were as effective as, or better than the industry standard of copper and mancozeb alone. The only exception was trifloxystrobin, which when used alone was less effective than the industry standard. Acibenzolar used alone was ineffective. Applying a mixture of azoxystrobin and acibenzolar was found to reduce the incidence of brown spot compared with applying azoxystrobin alone but, in either case, disease levels were not found to be significantly different to the industry standard. Captan, iprodione and chlorothalonil/pyrimthanil were as effective as the industry standard. The incidence and severity of rind damage were significantly lowest in the azoxystrobin, methoxycrylate, iprodione and chlorothalonil/pyrimthanil treatments. Medium and high rates of trifloxystrobin (0.07 g/L, 0 .15 g/L) and pyraclostrobin (0.8 g/L, 1.2 g/L) applied alone were the only treatments found to be IPM-incompatible as shown by the elevated level of scale infection on fruit.

Item Type:Article
Corporate Creators:Horticulture and Forestry Science
Additional Information:© Australasian Plant Pathology Society. Reproduced with permission from © CSIRO Publishing. Access to published version may be available via Publisher’s website.
Keywords:Induced resistance; integrated pest management; mandarin; orange; Alternaria alternata; citrus; Punctum blandianum.
Subjects:Plant pests and diseases > Individual or types of plants or trees
Plant pests and diseases > Pest control and treatment of diseases. Plant protection > Pesticides
Deposited On:20 Jul 2007
Last Modified:08 Jun 2015 15:50

Repository Staff Only: item control page