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Effective Use in Livestock Feeds of Mouldy and Weather-damaged Grain Containing Mycotoxins-Case Histories and Economic Assessments Pertaining to Pig and Poultry Industries of Queensland

Blaney, B.J. and Williams, K.C. (1991) Effective Use in Livestock Feeds of Mouldy and Weather-damaged Grain Containing Mycotoxins-Case Histories and Economic Assessments Pertaining to Pig and Poultry Industries of Queensland. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research, 42 (1). pp. 933-1012.

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AR9910993

Publisher URL: http://www.publish.csiro.au

Abstract

Mould growth in field crops or stored grain reduces starch and lipid content, with consequent increases in fibre, and an overall reduction in digestible energy; palatability is often adversely affected. If these factors are allowed for, and mycotoxin concentrations are low, there are sound economic reasons for using this cheaper grain.

Mycotoxins are common in stock feed but their effects on animal productivity are usually slight because either the concentration is too low or the animal is tolerant to the toxin. In Australia, aflatoxins occur in peanut by-products and in maize and sorghum if the grain is moist when stored. Zearalenone is found in maize and in sorghum and wheat in wetter regions. Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol are found in maize and wheat but at concentrations that rarely affect pigs, with chickens and cattle being even more tolerant. Other mycotoxins including cyclopiazonic acid, T-2 toxin, cytochalasins and tenuazonic acid are produced by Australian fungi in culture but are not found to be significant grain contaminants.

Extremely mouldy sorghum containing Alternaria and Fusarium mycotoxins decreased feed conversion in pigs and chickens by up to 14%. However, E moniliforme- and Diplodia maydis-infected maize produced only slight reductions in feed intake by pigs and Ustilago- infected barley produced no ill effects. Use of these grains would substantially increase profits if the grain can be purchased cheaply.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Reproduced with permission from © CSIRO Publishing. Access to published version may be available via Publisher’s website.
Keywords:Mycotoxins; Animal productivity; Field crops; Stock feed.
Subjects:Animal culture > Feeds and feeding. Animal nutrition
Deposited On:25 Aug 2005
Last Modified:13 Aug 2010 15:08

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