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Germination Biology and Occurrence of Polyembryony in Two Forms of Cats Claw Creeper Vine, Dolichandra unguis-cati (Bignoniaceae): Implications for Its Invasiveness and Management

C. Buru, Joshua and Dhileepan, Kunjithapatham and Osunkoya, Olusegun and Scharaschkin, Tanya (2016) Germination Biology and Occurrence of Polyembryony in Two Forms of Cats Claw Creeper Vine, Dolichandra unguis-cati (Bignoniaceae): Implications for Its Invasiveness and Management. American Journal of Plant Sciences, 07 (03). pp. 657-670. ISSN 2158-2742

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/ajps.2016.73058

Abstract

Cat’s claw creeper vine, Dolichandra unguis-cati (L.) Lohmann (syn. Macfadyena unguis-cati (L.) Gentry), is a major environmental weed in Australia. Two forms of the weed with distinctive leaf morphology and reproductive traits, including varying fruit size, occur in Queensland, Australia. The long pod form occurs in a few localities in Queensland, while the short pod form is widely distributed in Queensland and northern part of New South Wales. This investigation aimed to evaluate germination behavior and occurrence of polyembryony (production of multiple seedlings from a single seed) in the two forms of the weed. Seeds were germinated in growth chambers set to 10/20°C, 15/25°C, 20/30°C, 30/45°C and 25°C, representing ambient temperature conditions of the region. Germination and polyembryony were monitored over a period of 12 weeks. For all the treatments in this study, seeds from short pod plants exhibited significantly higher germination rates and higher occurrence of polyembryony than those from long pod plants. Seeds from long pod plants did not germinate at the lowest temperature of 10/20°C; in contrast, those of the short pod form germinated under this condition, albeit at a lower rate (reaching a maximum 45% germination at week 12). Results from this study could explain why the short pod form of D. unguis-cati is the more widely distributed plants in Australia, while the long pod is confined to a few localities. The results have implication in predicting future range of both forms of the invasive D. unguis-cati, as well as inform management decisions for control of the weed.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Biosecurity Queensland
Keywords:Macfadyena unguis-cati, Plant Sexual Reproduction, Plant Invasion, Propagule Pressure, Seed Ecology, Woody Vine
Subjects:Science > Invasive Species > Plants
Science > Invasive Species > Plants > Eradication and containment
Science > Invasive Species > Plants > Integrated weed control
Deposited On:04 Apr 2016 00:02
Last Modified:04 Apr 2016 00:02

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