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Two distinct classes of QTL determine rust resistance in sorghum

Wang, Xuemin and Mace, Emma and Hunt, Colleen and Cruickshank, Alan and Henzell, Robert and Parkes, Heidi and Jordan, David (2014) Two distinct classes of QTL determine rust resistance in sorghum. BMC Plant Biology, 14 (1). ISSN 1471-2229

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12870-014-0366-4

Publisher URL: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2229/14/366

Abstract

Background: Agriculture is facing enormous challenges to feed a growing population in the face of rapidly evolving pests and pathogens. The rusts, in particular, are a major pathogen of cereal crops with the potential to cause large reductions in yield. Improving stable disease resistance is an on-going major and challenging focus for many plant breeding programs, due to the rapidly evolving nature of the pathogen. Sorghum is a major summer cereal crop that is also a host for a rust pathogen which occurs in almost all sorghum growing areas of the world, causing direct and indirect yield losses in sorghum worldwide, however knowledge about its genetic control is still limited. In order to further investigate this issue, QTL and association mapping methods were implemented to study rust resistance in three bi-parental populations and an association mapping set of elite breeding lines in different environments. Results: In total, 64 significant or highly significant QTL and 21 suggestive rust resistance QTL were identified representing 55 unique genomic regions. Comparisons across populations within the current study and with rust QTL identified previously in both sorghum and maize revealed a high degree of correspondence in QTL location. Negative phenotypic correlations were observed between rust, maturity and height, indicating a trend for both early maturing and shorter genotypes to be more susceptible to rust. Conclusions: The significant amount of QTL co-location across traits, in addition to the consistency in the direction of QTL allele effects, has provided evidence to support pleiotropic QTL action across rust, height, maturity and stay-green, supporting the role of carbon stress in susceptibility to rust. Classical rust resistance QTL regions that did not co-locate with height, maturity or stay-green QTL were found to be significantly enriched for the defence-related NBS-encoding gene family, in contrast to the lack of defence-related gene enrichment in multi-trait effect rust resistance QTL. The distinction of disease resistance QTL hot-spots, enriched with defence-related gene families from QTL which impact on development and partitioning, provides plant breeders with knowledge which will allow for fast-tracking varieties with both durable pathogen resistance and appropriate adaptive traits.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Crop and Food Science
Keywords:Association mapping Height Maturity Pleiotropy QTL mapping Rust resistance Sorghum Stay-green
Subjects:Science > Botany > Genetics
Plant pests and diseases
Plant culture > Field crops > Sorghum
Deposited On:18 Mar 2015 06:31
Last Modified:08 Jun 2015 16:03

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