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Quantitative effects of in-line operations on Campylobacter and Escherichia coli through two Australian broiler processing plants

Duffy, Lesley L. and Blackall, Patrick J. and Cobbold, Rowland N. and Fegan, Narelle (2014) Quantitative effects of in-line operations on Campylobacter and Escherichia coli through two Australian broiler processing plants. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 188 . p. 128. ISSN 01681605

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2014.07.02...

Abstract

Campylobacter is an important food borne pathogen, mainly associated with poultry. A lack of through-chain quantitative Campylobacter data has been highlighted within quantitative risk assessments. The aim of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively measure Campylobacter and Escherichia coli concentration on chicken carcasses through poultry slaughter. Chickens (n = 240) were sampled from each of four flocks along the processing chain, before scald, after scald, before chill, after chill, after packaging and from individual caeca. The overall prevalence of Campylobacter after packaging was 83% with a median concentration of 0.8 log10 CFU/mL. The processing points of scalding and chilling had significant mean reductions of both Campylobacter (1.8 and 2.9 log10 CFU/carcase) and E. coli (1.3 and 2.5 log10 CFU/carcase). The concentration of E. coli and Campylobacter was significantly correlated throughout processing indicating that E. coli may be a useful indicator organism for reductions in Campylobacter concentration. The carriage of species varied between flocks, with two flocks dominated by Campylobacter coli and two flocks dominated by Campylobacter jejuni. Current processing practices can lead to significant reductions in the concentration of Campylobacter on carcasses. Further understanding of the variable effect of processing on Campylobacter and the survival of specific genotypes may enable more targeted interventions to reduce the concentration of this poultry associated pathogen.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Animal Science
Subjects:Agriculture > Agriculture (General) > Agricultural structures. Farm buildings
Animal culture > Poultry
Veterinary medicine > Veterinary pathology
Deposited On:25 Aug 2014 01:55
Last Modified:25 Aug 2014 01:55

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