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Localization of feeding of Anomalococcus indicus (Hemiptera: Lecanodiaspididae) and supplementary biological notes: Towards the biological management of the invasive tree Vachellia nilotica indica (Fabales: Mimosoideae) in North-Eastern Australia

Khan, A. N. and Raman, A. and Dhileepan, K. and Hodgkins, D. S. (2013) Localization of feeding of Anomalococcus indicus (Hemiptera: Lecanodiaspididae) and supplementary biological notes: Towards the biological management of the invasive tree Vachellia nilotica indica (Fabales: Mimosoideae) in North-Eastern Australia. Annales de la Societe Entomologique de France, 49 (4). pp. 476-492. ISSN 00379271 (ISSN)

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00379271.2014.896094

Abstract

. Management of the invasive Vachellia nilotica indica infesting tropical grasslands of Northern Australia has remained unsuccessful to date. Presently Anomalococcus indicus is considered a potential agent in the biological management of V. n. indica. Whereas generic biological details of A. indicus have been known, their feeding activity and details of their mouthparts and the sensory structures that are associated with their feeding action are not known. This paper provides details of those gaps. Nymphal instars I and II feed on cortical-parenchyma cells of young stems of V. n. indica, whereas nymphal instars III and adult females feed on phloem elements of older shoots. Nymphal instars and adults (females) trigger stress symptoms in the feeding tissue with cells bearing enlarged and disfigured nuclei, cytoplasmic shrinkage, cytoplasmic trabeculae, abnormal protuberances and uneven cell wall thickening, unusual cell membrane proliferation, and exhausted and necrosed cells. Continuous nutrient extraction by A. indicus can cause stem death. We provide evidence that A. indicus, by virtue of its continuous feeding activity and intense population build up, can be an effective biological-management agent to regulate populations of V. n. indica in infested areas. © 2014 © 2014 Société entomologique de France.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Biosecurity Queensland
Additional Information:Correspondence Address: Raman, A.; Charles Sturt University, PO Box 883, Orange, NSW 2800, Australia; email: araman@csu.edu.au
Keywords:biological control feeding action invasive plant prickly acacia stress physiology
Subjects:Science > Invasive Species > Plants
Plant pests and diseases
Deposited On:01 Jul 2014 01:14
Last Modified:01 Jul 2014 01:14

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