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QTL for nodal root angle in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) co-locate with QTL for traits associated with drought adaptation.

Mace, E.S. and Singh, V. and Van Oosterom, E.J. and Hammer, G.L. and Hunt, C.H. and Jordan, D.R. (2012) QTL for nodal root angle in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) co-locate with QTL for traits associated with drought adaptation. Theoretical and Applied Genetics, 124 (1). pp. 97-109.

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00122-011-1690-9

Publisher URL: http://www.springer.com

Abstract

Nodal root angle in sorghum influences vertical and horizontal root distribution in the soil profile and is thus relevant to drought adaptation. In this study, we report for the first time on the mapping of four QTL for nodal root angle (qRA) in sorghum, in addition to three QTL for root dry weight, two for shoot dry weight, and three for plant leaf area. Phenotyping was done at the six leaf stage for a mapping population (n = 141) developed by crossing two inbred sorghum lines with contrasting root angle. Nodal root angle QTL explained 58.2% of the phenotypic variance and were validated across a range of diverse inbred lines. Three of the four nodal root angle QTL showed homology to previously identified root angle QTL in rice and maize, whereas all four QTL co-located with previously identified QTL for stay-green in sorghum. A putative association between nodal root angle QTL and grain yield was identified through single marker analysis on field testing data from a subset of the mapping population grown in hybrid combination with three different tester lines. Furthermore, a putative association between nodal root angle QTL and stay-green was identified using data sets from selected sorghum nested association mapping populations segregating for root angle. The identification of nodal root angle QTL presents new opportunities for improving drought adaptation mechanisms via molecular breeding to manipulate a trait for which selection has previously been very difficult.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Agri-Science, Crop and Food Science, QAFFI
Additional Information:© Her Majesty the Queen in Rights of Australia as represented by The State of Queensland 2011.
Keywords:Different water regimes; grain-sorghum; stay-green; architectural traits; gravitropic response; genotypic variation; genetic dissection; use efficiency; dart markers; growth angle.
Subjects:Science > Biology > Genetics
Plant culture > Field crops > Sorghum
Deposited On:12 Apr 2012 04:42
Last Modified:12 Apr 2012 04:42

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