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Factors contributing to wear tolerance of Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers., C. dactylon x C. transvaalensis Burtt-Davey) on a sand-based profile under simulated sports field conditions

Roche, M.B. and Loch, D.S. and Jonothan, D.L. and Penberthy, C. and Durant, R. and Troughton, A.D. (2009) Factors contributing to wear tolerance of Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers., C. dactylon x C. transvaalensis Burtt-Davey) on a sand-based profile under simulated sports field conditions. In: 11th International Turfgrass Society Research Journal: 2009 International Turfgrass Research Conference. Santiago, Chile. International Turfgrass Society, pp. 449-459.

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Publisher URL: http://www.turfsociety.com
Organisation URL: http://www.horticulture.com.au
Organisation URL: http://www.deedi.qld.gov.au

Abstract

Wear resistance and recovery of 8 Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.) and hybrid Bermudagrass (C. Dactylon x C. transvaalensis Burtt-Davey) cultivars grown on a sandbased soil profile near Brisbane, Australia, were assessed in 4 wear trials conducted over a two year period. Wear was applied on a 7-day or a 14-day schedule by a modified Brinkman Traffic Simulator for 6-14 weeks at a time, either during winter-early spring or during summer-early autumn. The more frequent wear under the 7-day treatment was more damaging to the turf than the 14-day wear treatment, particularly during winter when its capacity for recovery from wear was severely restricted. There were substantial differences in wear tolerance among the 8 cultivars investigated, and the wear tolerance rankings of some cultivars changed between years. Wear tolerance was associated with high shoot density, a dense stolon mat strongly rooted to the ground surface, high cell wall strength as indicated by high total cell wall content, and high levels of lignin and neutral detergent fiber. Wear tolerance was also affected by turf age, planting sod quality, and wet weather. Resistance to wear and recovery from wear are both important components of wear tolerance, but the relative importance of their contributions to overall wear tolerance varies seasonally with turf growth rate.

Item Type:Book Section
Business groups:Agri-Science, Horticulture and Forestry Science
Additional Information:© International Turfgrass Society. Reproduced with permission.
Keywords:Cynodon dactylon; Cynodon dactylon X transvaalensis; simulated traffic stress; wear tolerance; turf; turfgrass; Australia.
Subjects:Plant culture > Lawns and turfgrasses > Sportsturf and greens
Plant culture > Lawns and turfgrasses
Plant culture
Plant culture > Lawns and turfgrasses > Performance and management
Deposited On:06 Sep 2011 02:29
Last Modified:06 Sep 2011 02:29

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