Login | Create Account (DAF staff only)

Activation of several key components of the epidermal differentiation pathway in cattle following infestation with the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

Kongsuwan, K. and Josh, P. and Colgrave, M.L. and Bagnall, N.H. and Gough, J. and Burns, B. and Pearson, R. (2010) Activation of several key components of the epidermal differentiation pathway in cattle following infestation with the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. International Journal for Parasitology, 40 (4). pp. 499-507.

Full text not currently attached. Access may be available via the Publisher's website or OpenAccess link.

Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpara.2009.10.013

Publisher URL: http://www.elsevier.com

Abstract

The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, and the diseases it transmits pose a persistent threat to tropical beef production. Genetic selection of host resistance has become the method of choice for non-chemical control of cattle tick. Previous studies have suggested that larval stages are most susceptible to host resistance mechanisms. To gain insights into the molecular basis of host resistance that occurs during R. microplus attachment, we assessed the abundance of proteins (by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and Western blot analyses) and mRNAs (by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR)) in skin adjacent to tick bite sites from high tick-resistant (HR) and low tick-resistant (LR) Belmont Red cattle following challenge with cattle tick. We showed substantially higher expression of the basal epidermal keratins KRT5 and KRT14, the lipid processing protein, lipocalin 9 (LCN9), the epidermal barrier catalysing enzyme transglutaminase 1 (TGM1), and the transcriptional regulator B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1) in HR skin. Our data reveals the essential role of the epidermal permeability barrier in conferring greater resistance of cattle to tick infestation, and suggest that the physical structure of the epidermal layers of the skin may represent the first line of defence against ectoparasite invasion. Crown Copyright. © Australian Society for Parasitology Inc.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:© Crown Copyright © Elsevier Ltd
Keywords:Rhipicephalus microplus; skin; host resistance; bovine; epidermis; attachment; gene expression; itraq analysis.
Subjects:Animal culture > Cattle
Science > Biology > Genetics
Deposited On:27 May 2010 00:21
Last Modified:27 May 2010 00:21

Repository Staff Only: item control page