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Field evaluation of spinosad as a grain protectant for stored wheat in Australia: efficacy against Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) and fate of residues in whole wheat and milling fractions

Daglish, G.J. and Head, M.B. and Hughes, P.B. (2008) Field evaluation of spinosad as a grain protectant for stored wheat in Australia: efficacy against Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) and fate of residues in whole wheat and milling fractions. Australian Journal of Entomology, 47 (1). pp. 70-74.

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-6055.2007.00629.x

Publisher URL: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com

Abstract

The potential of spinosad as a grain protectant for the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica, was investigated in a silo-scale trial on wheat stored in Victoria, Australia. Rhyzopertha dominica is a serious pest of stored grain, and its resistance to protectants and the fumigant phosphine is becoming more common. This trial follows earlier laboratory research showing that spinosad may be a useful pest management option for this species. Wheat (300 t) from the 2005 harvest was treated with spinosad 0.96 mg/kg plus chlorpyrifos-methyl 10 mg/kg in March 2006, and samples were collected at intervals during 7.5 month storage to determine efficacy and residues in wheat and milling fractions. Chlorpyrifos-methyl is already registered in Australia for control of several other pest species, and its low potency against R. dominica was confirmed in laboratory-treated wheat. Grain moisture content was stable at about 10%, but grain temperature ranged from 29.3°C in March to 14.0°C in August. Bioassays of all treated wheat samples over 7.5 months resulted in 100% adult mortality after 2 weeks exposure and no live progeny were produced. In addition, no live grain insects were detected during outload sampling after a 9 month storage. Spinosad and chlorpyrifos-methyl residues tended to decline during storage, and residues were higher in the bran layer than in either wholemeal or white flour. This field trial confirmed that spinosad was effective as a grain protectant targeting R. dominica.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Agri-Science, Crop and Food Science
Additional Information:© State of Queensland Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries. © Australian Entomological Society.
Keywords:Efficacy; lesser grain borer; residue; spinosad; wheat.
Subjects:Plant pests and diseases > Individual or types of plants or trees > Wheat
Agriculture > Agriculture (General) > Storage
Plant pests and diseases > Pest control and treatment of diseases. Plant protection > Pesticides
Deposited On:04 Feb 2010 05:32
Last Modified:27 Oct 2011 01:04

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