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Transmission of Japanese Encephalitis Virus from the Black Flying Fox, Pteropus alecto, to Culex annulirostris Mosquitoes, Despite the Absence of Detectable Viremia.

van den Hurk, A.F. and Smith, C.S. and Field, H.E. and Smith, I.L. and Northill, J.A. and Taylor, C.T. and Jansen, C.C. and Smith, G.A. and Mackenzie, J.S. (2009) Transmission of Japanese Encephalitis Virus from the Black Flying Fox, Pteropus alecto, to Culex annulirostris Mosquitoes, Despite the Absence of Detectable Viremia. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 81 (3). pp. 457-462.

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Publisher URL: http://www.astmh.org

Abstract

To determine the potential role of flying foxes in transmission cycles of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in Australia, we exposed Pteropus alecto (Megachiroptera: Pteropididae) to JEV via infected Culex annulirostris mosquitoes or inoculation. No flying foxes developed symptoms consistent with JEV infection. Anti-JEV IgG antibodies developed in 6/10 flying foxes exposed to infected Cx. annulirostris and in 5/5 inoculated flying foxes. Low-level viremia was detected by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in 1/5 inoculated flying foxes and this animal was able to infect recipient mosquitoes. Although viremia was not detected in any of the 10 flying foxes that were exposed to JEV by mosquito bite, two animals infected recipient mosquitoes. Likewise, an inoculated flying fox without detectable viremia infected recipient mosquitoes. Although infection rates in recipient mosquitoes were low, the high population densities in roosting camps, coupled with migratory behavior indicate that flying foxes could play a role in the dispersal of JEV.

Item Type:Article
Corporate Creators:Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI), Agri-Science, Crop and Food Science, QPIF
Business groups:Agri-Science, Crop and Food Science
Additional Information:© The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH).
Keywords:West Nile virus; valley fever virus; experimental infection; nonviremic transmission; nonvascular delivery; vector competence; Australia; susceptibility; Culicidae; Diptera.
Subjects:Science > Microbiology > Virology
Science > Physiology
Veterinary medicine > Diseases of special classes of animals
Deposited On:16 Nov 2009 05:27
Last Modified:26 Oct 2011 04:50

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