Login | Create Account (DAF staff only)

Sulfur-associated polioencephalomalacia in cattle grazing plants in the Family Brassicaceae

McKenzie, R.A. and Carmichael, A.M. and Schibrowski, M.L. and Duigan, S.A. and Gibson, J.A. and Taylor, J.D. (2009) Sulfur-associated polioencephalomalacia in cattle grazing plants in the Family Brassicaceae. Australian Veterinary Journal, 87 (1-2). pp. 27-32.

Full text not currently attached. Access may be available via the Publisher's website or OpenAccess link.

Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-0813.2008.00387.x

Publisher URL: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/home

Abstract

Polioencephalomalacia was diagnosed histologically in cattle from two herds on the Darling Downs, Queensland, during July-August 2007. In the first incident, 8 of 20 18-month-old Aberdeen Angus steers died while grazing pastures comprising 60% Sisymbrium irio (London rocket) and 40% Capsella bursapastoris (shepherd's purse). In the second incident, 2 of 150 mixed-breed adult cattle died, and another was successfully treated with thiamine, while grazing a pasture comprising almost 100% Raphanus raphanistrum (wild radish). Affected cattle were either found dead or comatose or were seen apparently blind and head-pressing in some cases. For both incidents, plant and water assays were used to calculate the total dietary sulfur content in dry matter as 0.62% and 1.01% respectively, both exceeding the recommended 0.5% for cattle eating more than 40% forage. Blood and tissue assays for lead were negative in both cases. No access to thiaminase, concentrated sodium ion or extrinsic hydrogen sulfide sources were identified in either incident. Below-median late summer and autumn rainfall followed by above-median unseasonal winter rainfall promoted weed growth at the expense of wholesome pasture species before these incidents.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:© Australian Veterinary Association.
Keywords:Brassicaceae; Cattle; Pasture weeds; Polioencephalomalacia; Clinical review; Sulfur; Cerebrocortical Necrosis; Sheep.
Subjects:Veterinary medicine > Veterinary toxicology
Animal culture > Rangelands. Range management. Grazing
Animal culture > Cattle
Animal culture > Feeds and feeding. Animal nutrition
Deposited On:14 Apr 2009 06:59
Last Modified:14 Apr 2009 06:59

Repository Staff Only: item control page