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Population genetics of the frog-killing fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis

Morgan, J.A.T. and Vredenburg, V.T. and Rachowicz, L.J. and Knapp, R.A. and Stice, M.J. and Tunstall, T. and Bingham, R.E. and Parker, J.M. and Longcore, J.E. and Moritz, C. and Briggs, C.J. and Taylor, J.W. (2007) Population genetics of the frog-killing fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 104 (34). pp. 13845-13850.

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0701838104

Publisher URL: http://www.nasonline.org

Abstract

Global amphibian decline by chytridiomycosis is a major environmental disaster that has been attributed to either recent fungal spread or environmental change that promotes disease. Here, we present a population genetic comparison of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis isolates from an intensively studied region of frog decline, the Sierra Nevada of California. In support of a novel pathogen, we find low diversity, no amphibian-host specificity, little correlation between fungal genotype and geography, local frog extirpation by a single fungal genotype, and evidence of human-assisted fungus migration. In support of endemism, at a local scale, we find some diverse, recombining populations. Therefore neither epidemic spread nor endemism alone explains this particular amphibian decline. Recombination raises the possibility of resistant sporangia and a mechanism for rapid spread as well as persistence that could greatly complicate global control of the pathogen.

Item Type:Article
Corporate Creators:Emerging Technologies
Additional Information:© The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.
Keywords:Chytridiomycosis; emerging infectious disease; enigmatic amphibian decline; global spread; recombination; animal disease; article; Chytridiomycetes; classification; female; frogs and toads; genetics; genotype; isolation and purification; male; microbiology; molecular genetics; mycosis; population genetics; United States; animals; Anura; California; Chytridiomycota; molecular sequence data; mycoses.
Subjects:Science > Science (General)
Science > Botany > Cryptogams
Science > Zoology > Chordates. Vertebrates > Reptiles and amphibians
Science > Biology > Genetics
Deposited On:24 Feb 2009 05:28
Last Modified:21 Apr 2011 00:27

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