Login | Create Account (DAF staff only)

Estimation of light interception in research environments: A joint approach using directional light sensors and 3D virtual plants applied to sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and Arabidopsis thaliana in natural and artificial conditions

Chenu, K. and Rey, H. and Dauzat, J. and Lydie, G. and Lecœur, J. (2008) Estimation of light interception in research environments: A joint approach using directional light sensors and 3D virtual plants applied to sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and Arabidopsis thaliana in natural and artificial conditions. Functional Plant Biology, 35 (10). pp. 850-866.

Full text not currently attached. Access may be available via the Publisher's website or OpenAccess link.

Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/FP08057

Publisher URL: http://www.publish.csiro.au/

Abstract

Light interception is a major factor influencing plant development and biomass production. Several methods have been proposed to determine this variable, but its calculation remains difficult in artificial environments with heterogeneous light. We propose a method that uses 3D virtual plant modelling and directional light characterisation to estimate light interception in highly heterogeneous light environments such as growth chambers and glasshouses. Intercepted light was estimated by coupling an architectural model and a light model for different genotypes of the rosette species Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh and a sunflower crop. The model was applied to plants of contrasting architectures, cultivated in isolation or in canopy, in natural or artificial environments, and under contrasting light conditions. The model gave satisfactory results when compared with observed data and enabled calculation of light interception in situations where direct measurements or classical methods were inefficient, such as young crops, isolated plants or artificial conditions. Furthermore, the model revealed that A. thaliana increased its light interception efficiency when shaded. To conclude, the method can be used to calculate intercepted light at organ, plant and plot levels, in natural and artificial environments, and should be useful in the investigation of genotype-environment interactions for plant architecture and light interception efficiency. This paper originates from a presentation at the 5th International Workshop on Functional–Structural Plant Models, Napier, New Zealand, November 2007.

Item Type:Article
Business groups:Agri-Science, Crop and Food Science
Additional Information:© CSIRO.
Keywords:Artificial environment; radiative model.
Subjects:Technology > Technology (General)
Science > Botany
Science > Statistics > Simulation modelling
Deposited On:29 Jan 2009 05:58
Last Modified:27 Oct 2011 01:31

Repository Staff Only: item control page