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Melaleuca densispicata in Currawinya National Park, South-West Queensland: Ecology and preliminary implications for management of a rare plant species

Silcock, J. and Page, M. (2007) Melaleuca densispicata in Currawinya National Park, South-West Queensland: Ecology and preliminary implications for management of a rare plant species. Ecological Management and Restoration, 8 (2). pp. 145-147.

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Article Link(s): http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-8903.2007.00353.x

Publisher URL: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/home

Abstract

Melaleuca densispicata Byrnes is an uncommon species with a limited distribution, comprising disjunct populations in inland southern Queensland and northern New South Wales, Australia. It is a dense, woody shrub, 2–4 m in height, which exhibits a marked 'clumping' growth habit. It has thick, papery bark and displays many white flowers during spring or early summer. Although it has long been known to exist, M. densispicata was only formally described in 1984, and very little is currently known about its ecology or specific management requirements.

There are only seven known subpopulations of the species across its range. A major population at the western limit of its distribution occurs on Currawinya National Park (28°52'S, 144°30'E). Here, it is locally abundant and listed as a noteworthy plant species under the Management Plan (Queensland Parks & Wildlife Service 2001). This study aimed to identify patterns in the distribution of M. densispicata in Currawinya National Park, describe its ecological niche and role, and provide management recommendations for the species within the study area. Recent anecdotal observations of recruitment failure in south-western Queensland (Peter McRae, QPWS, October 2004, pers. comm.; Dick O'Connell, local grazier, July 2005 pers. comm.) caused additional emphasis to be placed on the examination of recruitment and recruitment factors.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:© Ecological Society of Australia.
Keywords:Melaleuca; mulga lands; regeneration.
Subjects:Forestry
Science > Botany > Plant ecology
Deposited On:12 Jan 2009 06:04
Last Modified:29 Sep 2010 05:22

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